2018 NW Diversity Learning Series

Inclusion Provocateur: Bridging the Human Divides

What is an Inclusion Provocateur?

An Inclusion Provocateur is a catalyst for courageous dialogue, discussions, conversations, relationships, curiosity.

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2018 NW Diversity Learning Series Topics

 
 
 
 
 
 

Polarities and Resistance: Creating an Inclusive and Sustainable Approach to Change

Session 1: Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Do you tire of having many diversity initiatives, none of which last long enough to make real change? Do you often feel backed into a corner, defending the importance of D&I? Do you understand the fears of those who block inclusion so you can both support and nudge them to change?

 

As a diversity change agent, you will learn how to handle these situations and many more when you understand Polarity Thinking.  All of us have been trained to think in either/or terms and to solve problems.   Either we use the masculine way of leading OR we use the feminine.  Either we use familiar ways of building and leading teams OR we launch into unknown territory with diverse teams and fear failure.  Either we are timid about engaging those of different genders and races or we speak our mind and fear reprisals.

 

Polarity Thinking teaches us to think and communicate in Both/And terms. We can have BOTH masculine AND feminine leadership styles, similar AND diverse teams, diplomatic AND direct conversations.  In fact, the research is clear—leaders, teams, and organizations that leverage Polarities well both outperform those that don’t and have sustainable change, whether the focus is strategic planning, restructuring, or D&I.

 

While problems have a best solution, Polarities are interdependent values, both of which are needed to achieve a higher purpose.  Commonalities AND Differences are a polarity, both needed for sustainable change.  If we focus only on commonalities, we ignore differences, losing talent and building resentment.  If we focus only on differences, we have little common ground to abate our fears and recognize our needs as human beings.

 

With the knowledge from this session you will be able to do the following:

  • Understand the basics of Polarity Theory

  • Distinguish between a problem to solve and a polarity to leverage. 

  • Use the Polarity Map to understand and communicate multiple values and fears, especially with regard to diversity and inclusion.

  • Leverage a polarity—getting the best of both values—by creating actions steps and early warnings.

Presenters:

Cherie, Senior Consultant with the Yarbrough Group is an acknowledged leader with extensive business background including positions in organizational development, operations, human resources, diversity, program management, sales, marketing, business development and e-commerce. Her expertise includes cross cultural collaboration, leadership development, facilitation, consultation and coaching for individuals, teams and organizations. She has utilized her broad consultative skills both as an internal and external provider in the corporate environment internationally, in work with institutions of higher learning, federal, state and city government and with a wide range of non-profit organizations.  She has a proven track record in working with a broad client population, including those located in Latin America, Europe, Africa, Canada and the U.S.

 

Cherie, a certified professional coach holds a B.S. degree in Management and Organizational Leadership from George Fox University, a Masters of Social Work from Northwest Nazarene University and a wealth of additional training and certifications in specific disciplines that support her work.  She brings 30+ years of experience in management positions with Fortune 500 companies to her coaching/consulting practice.

She has served in the Idaho Legislature since 2010.  Elected to the Idaho House of Representatives in 2010, and to the Idaho Senate in 2012, 2014 and 2016 by a wide margin, Cherie currently serves as Assistant Minority Leader in the Idaho State Senate.  Additionally, she is a respected speaker who is in high demand for her presentations addressing a wide range of topics relevant to public, private, academic and government sectors.

Lindsay, Partner with The Yarbrough Group, focuses on developing the next generation of leadership, bringing in the perspective of women and the experience of generations X and Y.  She leads training in interpersonal, group, and organizational conflict resolution techniques; facilitates team development, and strategic planning; and coaches individuals so they can reach their full potential.

 

Lindsay graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in Political Science and has her Masters from George Mason University School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR). Her studies have focused on engaging women in peace building processes in post-conflict context. She is a graduate of the Mastery level class of Polarity Thinking. 

 

The majority of her work has been articulating the underlying motivation for peoples’ political involvement.  Previously, she worked as the Senior Program Assistant for Governance at the National Democratic Institute (NDI) based in Washington, DC.  Lindsay also served as the Development Director for the Center for the Study of Gender and Conflict at George Mason University and a Researcher for the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars Global Women’s Leadership Initiative (GWLI). Her background is in political campaigns and the impacts of policy. Currently she is consulting with the Women’s Forum (United Nations) on how to rejuvenate women’s leadership in western Europe.

 

Lindsay lives in Washington DC with her dog Sterling.

Religious Dominance - Religious Pluralism: Understanding Un-Discussed Polarity

Session 2: Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Religion is one of the primary human divides. Rather than trying to understand other religions first, this session focuses on dominant Christianity, the impact it has had on the political, economic, and cultural systems of the United States, and how it manifests in our behaviors, beliefs, values, relationships, and workplaces.

 

What holidays are recognized in your workplace? What norms exclude or marginalize Muslims, Jews, atheists and other non-Christians? Are there key Christian concepts that shape the way people think and behave in embracing or distancing themselves from issues of diversity and multiculturalism? Are there Christian leaders, denominations or parachurch organizations that influence the way that equity issues are addressed in your community?

 

Just as hierarchies of race and gender in the workplace empower some, marginalize others, and lead to ineffectiveness, high turnover, tarnished interpersonal relationships, and destructive personal behavior, our religious hierarchy has major implications for our organizations as well. 

 

We have enshrined freedom of religion in our Constitution in the phrase “separation of church and state”(notice the use of the word “church”) but even that is under attack. How do we create organizations based on religious pluralism so that the wisdom, creativity and inspiration of non-Christian traditions is valued and honored and no one is disrespected, marginalized, or excluded from full participation?

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will:

  • Understand how Christian dominance manifests in society, in individuals, and in organizations.   

  • Explain how the Christian concepts of dualism, individualism, sin and salvation, one truth, and dominion over nature affects how we think, the language we use, and how we perceive and behave toward difference

  • Understand the connections between Christian dominance and how certain groups of people are marginalized or Othered

 

Presenter:

Paul Kivel‘s work grows out of over 45 years in community education, engaged parenthood, political writing, and practical activism all focused on one overriding question: “How can we live and work together to nurture each individual and create a multicultural society based on love, caring, justice, and interdependence with all living things?”

Paul was co-founder of the Oakland Men’s Project and a leader in the anti-violence movement developing resources to work with men against sexism and male violence.  He is also part of the group that started SURJ—Showing Up for Racial Justice and a leader in the anti-racist movement developing resources for white people working for racial and economic justice.  His work gives people the understanding to become involved in social justice work and the tools to act as effective allies in community struggles to end oppression and injustice and to transform organizations and institutions.

 

He is the author of You Call This a Democracy?  Men’s Work, and Helping Teens Stop Violence, Build Community and Stand for Justice. His most recent books are a revised, updated 4th edition of Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice and Living in the Shadow of the Cross. Learn more at about Paul and his work on his website: www.paulkivel.com

Power and Privilege: Addressing Loss, Striving for Equity

Session 3: Wednesday, May 9, 2018

So often in the conversations of power and privilege, those with power (especially white men) are demonized and those without power are painted as helpless. The questions appear to be “Why won’t you give up power?” and “How can we breakdown privilege?” These questions can stall progress as they set up an either/or dynamic – EITHER the privileged group keeps power OR the minority group takes power.

 

Reframing this dialogue into one of polarities and integrating BOTH/AND thinking increases the ability to be an inclusion provocateur. Questions become:

• How can we both hold power to benefit our community?

• How can we both share power to benefit our community?

• How will we flag that one group is clutching their power and not sharing?

• How will we flag that we are over-sharing power in a way that is not helpful to the community?

 

These questions reframe the systemic dynamic and break down the individual barriers to discussing power and privilege while also shifting the systems in which power and privilege create disparity.

 

In this interactive session, participants will explore their own relationship to power, different approaches to talking about power and privilege, and practice using Polarity Thinking to support the goal of being an inclusion provocateur.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Refresh their understanding of the basics of Polarity Theory (or Polarity Thinking

  • Distinguish personal power and positional power

  • See ways to claim part of their personal privilege that derives from dimensions of their identity (race, religion, gender, class, sexual orientation, gender identity)

  • Recognize the impact of one’s personal privilege on self and others

  • Identify potential ways to use privilege honorably 

 

Presenters:

Cherie Buckner-Webb, Senior Consultant with the Yarbrough Group is an acknowledged leader with extensive business background including positions in organizational development, operations, human resources, diversity, program management, sales, marketing, business development and e-commerce. Her expertise includes cross cultural collaboration, leadership development, facilitation, consultation and coaching for individuals, teams and organizations. She has utilized her broad consultative skills both as an internal and external provider in the corporate environment internationally, in work with institutions of higher learning, federal, state and city government and with a wide range of non-profit organizations.  She has a proven track record in working with a broad client population, including those located in Latin America, Europe, Africa, Canada and the U.S.

 

Cherie, a certified professional coach holds a B.S. degree in Management and Organizational Leadership from George Fox University, a Masters of Social Work from Northwest Nazarene University and a wealth of additional training and certifications in specific disciplines that support her work.  She brings 30+ years of experience in management positions with Fortune 500 companies to her coaching/consulting practice.

She has served in the Idaho Legislature since 2010.  Elected to the Idaho House of Representatives in 2010, and to the Idaho Senate in 2012, 2014 and 2016 by a wide margin, Cherie currently serves as Assistant Minority Leader in the Idaho State Senate.  Additionally, she is a respected speaker who is in high demand for her presentations addressing a wide range of topics relevant to public, private, academic and government sectors.

Lindsay Burr, Partner with The Yarbrough Group, focuses on developing the next generation of leadership, bringing in the perspective of women and the experience of generations X and Y.  She leads training in interpersonal, group, and organizational conflict resolution techniques; facilitates team development, and strategic planning; and coaches individuals so they can reach their full potential.

 

Lindsay graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in Political Science and has her Masters from George Mason University School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR). Her studies have focused on engaging women in peace building processes in post-conflict context. She is a graduate of the Mastery level class of Polarity Thinking. 

 

The majority of her work has been articulating the underlying motivation for peoples’ political involvement.  Previously, she worked as the Senior Program Assistant for Governance at the National Democratic Institute (NDI) based in Washington, DC.  Lindsay also served as the Development Director for the Center for the Study of Gender and Conflict at George Mason University and a Researcher for the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars Global Women’s Leadership Initiative (GWLI). Her background is in political campaigns and the impacts of policy. Currently she is consulting with the Women’s Forum (United Nations) on how to rejuvenate women’s leadership in western Europe.

 

Lindsay lives in Washington DC with her dog Sterling.

Free Speech, Hate Speech, Political Correctness: Struggling with Civility and Respect

Session 4: Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Our national discourse has become infected with negativity. The boring, dry policy debates of the past are replaced by divisive political discourse in a charged political landscape. Battles over free speech and what constitutes hate speech and political correctness are enmeshed in tribal political identities. The speed and anonymity of social media and new media platforms have emboldened activists on the left and right. The norms of civil discourse can feel like a quaint – and antiquated – memory. These conversations are driven by passion and strong sets of values. But it can be hard to get to the underlying values when we are bombarded by policies we often recoil from on a visceral level.

 

In this session, we will have a panel discussion focusing on the impact of divisive communication on the ability of companies and organizations to do their work:

  • Kara Laverde, Deputy Director, People & Organization Potential at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

  • Michelle Diggles, Deputy Editor and Research Director, Bloomberg Cities

 

Then we will focus on tools in order to help:

  • How can we engage in productive political conversations?

  • How can we harness our emotions to understand our perspective and those of others?

  • When we know we can only control our own responses and not those of others, how can we set ourselves up for successful difficult conversations?

 

To build greater capacity for Inclusion Provocateurs, this session will use polarities to unpack our personal assumptions and how they manifest in ongoing struggles faced by society.  Each of us can bring civility back to divisive interactions and demonstrate respect, even in the face of seemingly oppositional viewpoints. We can all develop strategies to make sure we’re creating a space for the point of view of others alongside our own.

 

Learning Objectives: By the end of this session, participants will increase their competency as “inclusion provocateurs” by:
 

  • Learning or refreshing their understanding of the basics of Polarity Theory/Paradoxical Thinking.

  • Learning or refreshing their understanding of Question Thinking.

  • Being able to apply Question Thinking and paradoxical thinking to political discussions.

  • Understanding one’s own values and underlying assumptions, as well as those of others.

  • Building an action plan to create space for civil discourse.

Presenters:

Michelle Diggles is the Deputy Editor for Research of the Bloomberg Cities Content Unit at Freedman Consulting, LLC. Drawing upon decades of political experience and multi-method research expertise, Dr. Diggles unearths knowledge and insights from public sector innovation at the municipal level to help practitioners better engage and serve their communities. Her facilitation style builds on experience with grassroots organizing and emphasizes hands-on training, real life examples and tangible take-aways. She has conducted workshops, served as a peer mentor, and hosted numerous trainings and briefings for young professionals, mid-career professionals, and rank-and-file union members.

 

She previously was the lead public opinion and political analyst at the Washington, DC-based think tank Third Way, served as an advocate for students and tenants, and worked on several political campaigns. Dr. Diggles was a professor of international affairs and political science at Lewis & Clark College and has also taught at American University, the University of Oregon, and Portland State University. Her work has appeared in such outlets as MSNBC, FOX News, Washington Journal, The Atlantic, The National Journal, USA Today, Real Clear Politics, Politico, The Washington Post, and Slate.

 

Michelle earned her Bachelor of Science in Political Science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and her Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oregon.

Lindsay Burr, Partner with The Yarbrough Group, focuses on developing the next generation of leadership, bringing in the perspective of women and the experience of generations X and Y.  She leads training in interpersonal, group, and organizational conflict resolution techniques; facilitates team development, and strategic planning; and coaches individuals so they can reach their full potential.

 

Lindsay graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in Political Science and has her Masters from George Mason University School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR). Her studies have focused on engaging women in peace building processes in post-conflict context. She is a recent graduate of the Mastery level class of Polarity Thinking. 

 

The majority of her work has been articulating the underlying motivation for peoples’ political involvement.  Previously, she worked as the Senior Program Assistant for Governance at the National Democratic Institute (NDI) based in Washington, DC.  Lindsay also served as the Development Director for the Center for the Study of Gender and Conflict at George Mason University and a Researcher for the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars Global Women’s Leadership Initiative (GWLI). Her background is in political campaigns and the impacts of policy. Currently she is consulting with the Women’s Forum (United Nations) on how to rejuvenate women’s leadership in western Europe.

 

Lindsay lives in Washington DC with her dog Sterling.

Us and Them: Navigating the Multicultural Divides

Session 5: Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Us And Them. Them And Us. Us against Them. Them against Us. However you word it, it's clear there is a tension, a stress, a sense of competing interests between these two parts.

 

This is how a duality works. It traps our thinking into either this or that. What if this trap of using Either/Or thinking to the neglect of Both/And thinking is a fundamental cause and perpetrator of  Sexism, Racism, and Poverty?

What if this same Either/Or thinking about "us and them" also undermines our efforts to address some of the most significant dualities testing American society and seeping into workplace interactions: Immigrants And American born, Rural And Urban, Nationalism And Globalism, Individualism And Collectivism. Using the tools of polarity thinking we will increase our ability to bridge these divides by exploring the perspectives that inform them.

In our efforts to become a change provocateur to support equity, here are some questions we might ask ourselves about changing the dialogue of "us" and "them":

  • How do I/we both Claim Power And Share Power?

  • How do I/we both Include And Provoke?

In this interactive session, participants will explore cultural vantage points, examine the polarities that inform Us And Them, and practice using Polarity Thinking to support the goal of being an Inclusion Provocateur.

Learning Objectives: By the end of this session, participants will:

  • Learn or refresh their understanding of the basics of Polarity Thinking or Paradoxical Thinking

  • Understand the importance of AND Thinking when addressing issues like Sexism, Racism, and Poverty

  • Learn how to leverage one of four key polarities that may arise in workplace conversations and conflicts

  • Explore how to apply Polarity Thinking as a practice in the workplace

Presenters:

In 1975, Barry Johnson created the first Polarity Map® and set of principles. Since then he has been learning, with clients, how to leverage polarities, also known as paradoxes, dilemmas, or tensions. Polarity Thinking has been applied in hundreds of organizations, large and small, in the United States and globally.

 

Barry has worked with a variety of organizations:

 

Business and Industry – Amoco, GM, Intel of Ireland, Cargill, Wal-Mart, Hyster-Yale, Hershey, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, New York Live Insurance, Natura of Brazil, SASOL of South Africa.

 

Government – International Atomic Energy Agency, US Department of Defense, NASA, US Federal Executive Institute, US Defense Acquisition University, UK National Health Service, UK Cabinet Top Management Programme, UK National Audit Office, Canada Post of Ontario, Provincial Government of Alberta, Northwest Department of Health and National Treasury Republic of South Africa, Charleston Police Department and City of Charleston.

 

Education – Notre Dame, Learning Innovations Lab (LILA) at Harvard, Washington University of St. Louis, Purdue College of Engineering, University of St Thomas, Potchefstroom University and University of Cape Town in South Africa, University of Cincinnati, University of Minnesota, University of the Virgin Islands, University of Michigan.

 

Not-for-profit – Bread for the World, Archdiocese of Chicago, Christian Reformed Church, Local Future in Michigan, EcoSocial in Brazil, Southridge Shelter in Ontario.

 

He is devoted to his family, an avid outdoorsman and intrepid traveler, and brings head and heart together in his presentations, teaching and consulting. Barry and his wife, Dana, have 5 children and 11 grandchildren.

 

His 1992 book, Polarity Management®: Identifying and Managing Unsolvable Problems (Human Resource Development Press) is in wide use in businesses and community organizations. His third book, AND, How to Leverage Polarity, Paradox, or Dilemma, will be out in 2019.

Peter Whitt established Enlightenment Consultant Group, LLC, as a catalyst for transformation. He strives to support leaders manage tensions through an integrative approach and strategies at the individual, team, organization and community levels. His work centers on leadership. He has worked with diverse leaders in urban neighborhoods to leaders in philanthropy and government organizations.

Peter serves on the Community Relations Board for the City of Cleveland. He provides leadership as chair of the Race Relations committee.

Through his ongoing effort addressing race inequity, Peter wrote a section in a book published in 2016 titled, A Race Anthology: Dispatches and Artifacts from a Segregated City. This section shared his perspective on race inequity as an African American.

Peter has been on the faculty for Polarity Partnerships. LLC, a two-year Mastery Program where participants receive the highest level of certification in Polarity Thinking. Peter has co-lectured a course for the Master of Diversity Management Program at Cleveland State University.  He has served as the Associate Director for the Center for Health Equity at Cleveland State University (CSU) Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs. He has also served as the Director of Community Outreach at St. Vincent Charity Hospital.

Peter is certified by the Gestalt Institute of Cleveland in coaching and organization interventions. Peter attended the University of Pittsburgh and graduated from the School of Social Work.

He also holds the title of Maha Guru (Senior Teacher-Master level) in the art of Kun Tao & Silat as part of the Willem Reeders-Sikes Lineage.  He has used this valued life long learning as tool for leadership development and emotional intelligence, not just a punch and kick.

Elizabeth Welch is an International Coach Federation certified coach and organizational development consultant in Cleveland, Ohio, specializing in Polarity Thinking, individual and team learning, and cultural influences on relationships. She employs a Gestalt approach with its relational stance and values of dialogue and respect for multiple perspectives in supporting client capacity growth.

A former English professor, Elizabeth pays special attention to language and metaphor in her work in diversity and inclusive culture building. Her coaching practice includes adults and groups in personal, academic, and professional transition. Elizabeth is a faculty co-chair of the 2018 Gestalt Training Program at the Gestalt Institute of Cleveland.

Native Americans: Undoing the Last Acceptable Racism

Session 6: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Undoing the last acceptable racism. This statement exemplifies the complexities faced by Native people who are striving to retain their lifeways in the face of competing interests, constant challenges, and outright racism and violence. Native people exist in a paradoxical world, but meet their difficulties head on through their traditions and values. They pass on their teachings to their children through stories and ceremonies. This session will engage participants in some of the ways of Native people — rediscovering personal stories and ceremonies as a means to create change, undo what appears to be “acceptable” racism, and promote inclusion within the workplace.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the session, participants will:

  • Identify their own source of oral tradition (such as storytelling) to transmit information, communicate, and lead.

  • Practice ceremony as a vehicle for undoing racism, promoting inclusion, and fostering healing.

  • Identify the behaviors and actions that make them a warrior for change in their workplace and community.
     

Presenters:

Mr. Jay LaPlante has dedicated his career to improving the lives and health of diverse individuals and communities, with an emphasis and expertise in Indian Country. For over 30 years, he has provided training and technical assistance and directed programs promoting health and wellness, emergency preparedness, environmental health investigations, disease prevention and other positive social, health, education and policy changes.

 

Mr. LaPlante is an expert in community engagement and has worked with many urban and rural communities and American Indian and Alaska Native tribes, states, and the federal government, non-profit organizations, and individuals throughout the United States and Canada. He is a co-founder of the Native Wellness Institute and served as a lead facilitator in the Gathering of Native Americans (GONA) movement, a holistic Native culture-based community approach to healing. He is a member of the Blackfoot and Cree Nations.

Ms. Barbara Aragon draws from over 40 years of experience in working with diverse audiences providing training and technical assistance in the fields of education, health and behavioral health.  Her expertise is in community wellness and healing; cultural fluency, emergency preparedness, trauma informed approaches and empowerment.  She has taught social work practice and case management with UC Davis and California State University, Sacramento.  She has also worked with corporations, counties, tribes, states, federal agencies throughout the continental United States, Canada and the Pacific Basin.

Ms. Aragon’s passion is in facilitating dialogue among diverse audiences regarding community resilience and healing and how indigenous traditions i.e. story, culture, and ceremony are imbedded with trauma-informed principles and how they can be key to the wellness and balance of individuals and communities.

Ms. Aragon is a mother, grandmother and storyteller of Laguna Pueblo, Crow and French-Canadian heritage

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