2019 NW Diversity Learning Series

When Systems Collide - Be a Pillar for Inclusion and Care

2019 NW Diversity Learning Series Topics
 
Click on the topic of interest in the list below or simply scroll down the page to learn more about all of the sessions!
January 29, 2019:           Striving to Achieve Equity in Organizations: The Next Level of Change
March 12, 2019:              Leading with Equity: Rooting Out Bias Deep and Wide
May 14, 2019:                  Mending the Broken Trust Between Black Women and White Women
June 25, 2019:                  Reconciliation: Building Allyship Between Black Men and White Men
September 24, 2019:      Grappling with Cultural Humility for the Intersectional Person with Invisible Disabilities
November 12, 2019:        Communicating in Polarizing Times: Words Matter!
Logistics for all sessions:

Time:  8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (continental breakfast served at 7:45 am)

Location: Nordstrom Flagship Store, Seattle

                  1617 6th Avenue

                  5th Floor, J.W. Nordstrom Meeting Room

 

Accessibility:  Hearing assistance devices are available through Nordstrom. Please request this service at least two-weeks in advance of a session letting us know what kind of device you use so that we can coordinate with Nordstrom personnel. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation, by certified interpreters, is available upon request at all Series sessions. Please note that requests for this service must be received by NWDLS at least three weeks prior to a session.

NOTE: (Please note: Order of session dates may shift for topics 3 through 6 as we work with presenters. We will update the website if this occurs.)
 
 
 
 
 

Striving to Achieve Equity in Organizations: The Next Level of Change

Session 1: Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Equity is a term being added to Diversity and Inclusion. Why is that? Why is it relevant for organizations, for individuals? This session will take on the meaning of Equity—its myths—what it is, what it isn’t.

 

Although we want to gain skills and knowledge about equity, it is our feelings and emotions that drive us to act to make the change we ultimately want to see. To embody this deeper learning, we will play a game, the Psychology of Privilege (a PIFF simulation). The game reveals what happens when we are randomly assigned a role in the “game of life”—rigged the way it really is—inequitable!

 

Come prepared to have fun playing this game and to gain powerful insights about the dynamics of superiority and oppression. You may be surprised by what plays out through you, even though you know the game is rigged. 

 

In the process, we’ll peer through several lenses to understand the dynamics: the Neuroscience of the human mind, social conditioning that shapes how we think and behave, unlearning misconceptions, and making room for new ones. We will consider how to infuse empathy and awareness into our systems, knowing more about the emotional impacts of inequity. We will engage in experiential learning that you can replicate back on the job to engage your colleagues in the work of equity.

 

“Creating Equity requires developing conscious power.” —Kristina Katayama

 

 

Learning Objectives:

 

As a result of attending this session, participants will:  

  • Know 4 practices to move from talking about equity to being equitable. 

  • Develop compassion and insight into the impact of inequitable systems, necessary for change to occur. 

  • Understand how social systems, institutional systems, and human nature perpetuate inequities.

  • Have a process to begin identifying and proposing changes to systems to create more equitable outcomes.

 

Presenters:

Kristina Katayama, Facilitator, Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership

Kristina Katayama has 20 years experience as a Leadership and Organizational Consultant, Facilitator and Coach, designing and delivering programs grounded in the practical application of the findings of neuroscience, emotional and social intelligence, and the power of presence, empathy and honesty. Kristina is a catalyst for connected engagement, peak performance and courageous leadership.

 

Passionate about human development and human systems, her engagements have brought her across more than 30 countries from Norway to Honduras, Australia to Japan, Germany to China, and include completing her bilingual MBA in Spain. Her experience has given her a deep appreciation for equity and social justice, and conversational fluency in 4 languages.

 

Kristina has supported organizations across all stages of development, from small private businesses to Fortune 100s including GM Europe, Boeing, AT&T Wireless, IBM Japan and Microsoft. She has also worked with governmental agencies and non-profit organizations including PATH, Education Service Districts, City of Seattle, Port of Seattle, Hopelink, and Real Change.

 

Today, Kristina’s practice is focused on Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership process-consulting using shared analysis and purpose, from leadership of self to collective leadership to co-create powerful, adaptive and resilient systems. Kristina’s consciousness raising work brings out the vitality of humanity in our teams, organizations and communities.

 

Awards and Honors

 * President’s Award of Excellence for Leadership, International Business Group (2006)

 * Legacy Award for Consulting Partner of the Year, Executive Service Corps (2011)

 * Professional Development co-chair for Human Systems Development Professionals (2017-2019)

 * Community of Practice with Leadership Eastside (2018-2019)

 

On a personal note, Kristina dedicates about 10% of her practice to non-profit and social justice organizations including 501 Commons, the Underground Railroad, and the Freedom Project. She also delights in being a mother, outdoor adventure, dancing, yoga, “the Mind Illuminated” mindfulness meditation student teacher and intentional community living.

 

Nikum Pon, Ph.D., Co-founder, Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership.

Dr. Nikum Pon has dedicated the last 22 years of his life working with a wide range of students and their families in racially, linguistically, and culturally diverse communities in predominantly low-income settings in the greater Seattle area. He spent nine of those years at SafeFutures Youth Center, a grassroots community/youth development agency that serves predominantly low-income Southeast Asians and East African youth and families. As a staff member, he was directly responsible for four major programs - National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA), After-school Tutorial, Asset Team, and Bilingual Case Management services. As a result, 95% of youth who were gang-involved or at-risk of gang involvement graduated from high school and/or moved on to working full-time to support their families. As a board of directors’ secretary and president, he oversaw SFYC’s development in operations, policies and procedures, long-term strategic planning, annual evaluation of the executive director, board development and financial management. As a result, SFYC’s budget doubled to 2 million dollars. Furthermore, Nikum has taught a number of undergraduate and graduate level courses at the University of Washington and Seattle Pacific University while conducting various mixed-method research on racial equity pertaining specifically to immigrant refugee students and families of color.

 

Currently, Nikum is the Director of Equity in Education for the Puget Sound Educational Service District (PSESD). In this position, he and his team support King and Pierce county school districts toward systems transformation to ensure academic excellence for each and every student, which upholds the PSESD’s mission to ensure success for each child and eliminate the opportunity gap by leading with racial equity. He has developed and implemented research-based gap closing strategies along with providing on-going racial equity training and coaching for a wide-range of educators both locally and regionally to build their capacity to strengthen students’ educational outcomes.  

 

Nikum’s academic preparation includes a Bachelor’s Degree in Cell Molecular Biology and Doctor of Philosophy degree in Educational Psychology and Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington, and Master’s Degree in Education from Seattle Pacific University. In addition, he completed his certification in Adaptive Leadership, a high impact collaborative leadership model, from Leadership Eastside as class of 2017. Nikum is a life-long learner as he continues to find ways to deepen his learning as a systems thinker, leader and critical race theorist. 

Leading with Equity: Rooting Out Bias Deep and Wide

Session 2: Tuesday, March 12, 2019

We aren’t stuck in a system—we are the system. Yikes! We are the ones who unconsciously maintain socially conditioned biases in our systems. 

 

In this session, we’re going to "Get REAL": Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership. Participants will be introduced to the elements of this profound leadership model, which begins with the Leadership of Self. Each person, employee and leader, must continuously develop their awareness and capabilities to root out the inequities of racism—a profoundly unconscious social conditioning that infects all of our organizations. Leaders who have access and control over resources and authoritative power over others have an added responsibility to push the status quo from talking about equity to “being” equitable.

 

In addition to Leadership of Self, everyone must learn how to:

 

  • Analyze systems to identify inequities

  • Intervene skillfully and collectively to disrupt and dismantle the inequities maintained by the system

  • Collaborate with those who benefit from and are harmed by the system to re-imagine and reconstruct more equitable systems and outcomes

 

This is a disruptive process — it reveals the disturbing gaps between the values we believe and lived realities of inequitable outcomes. This session is designed to build a container for this disruption and to support employees and leaders in discovering and learning about “being” equitable in their real work environments.

 

Improv learning: Come and experience the power of race-based caucusing! Heighten your individual and our collective awareness of the profoundly unconscious social conditioning in each of us—unconsciously acting to hold racial oppression / superiority in place!

 

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will:

  • Review ways (from the January 29th session) to “be” about racial equity (vs. just talking about it)

  • Deepen understanding of the systemic cognitive dissonance embedded into U.S. American history, institutions, culture and current inequitable racial outcomes

  • Become familiar with Power Analysis to identify the gaps between expressed values and the lived experiences of inequitable outcomes

  • Learn a strategy to raise awareness and interrupt unconscious racial bias, beliefs and behaviors

 

Presenters:

Kristina Katayama, Facilitator, Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership.

Kristina Katayama has 20 years experience as a Leadership and Organizational Consultant, Facilitator and Coach, designing and delivering programs grounded in the practical application of the findings of neuroscience, emotional and social intelligence, and the power of presence, empathy and honesty. Kristina is a catalyst for connected engagement, peak performance and courageous leadership.

 

Passionate about human development and human systems, her engagements have brought her across more than 30 countries from Norway to Honduras, Australia to Japan, Germany to China, and include completing her bilingual MBA in Spain. Her experience has given her a deep appreciation for equity and social justice, and conversational fluency in 4 languages.

 

Kristina has supported organizations across all stages of development, from small private businesses to Fortune 100s including GM Europe, Boeing, AT&T Wireless, IBM Japan and Microsoft. She has also worked with governmental agencies and non-profit organizations including PATH, Education Service Districts, City of Seattle, Port of Seattle, Hopelink, and Real Change.

 

Today, Kristina’s practice is focused on Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership process-consulting using shared analysis and purpose, from leadership of self to collective leadership to co-create powerful, adaptive and resilient systems. Kristina’s consciousness raising work brings out the vitality of humanity in our teams, organizations and communities.

 

Awards and Honors

 * President’s Award of Excellence for Leadership, International Business Group (2006)

 * Legacy Award for Consulting Partner of the Year, Executive Service Corps (2011)

 * Professional Development co-chair for Human Systems Development Professionals (2017-2019)

 * Community of Practice with Leadership Eastside (2018-2019)

 

On a personal note, Kristina dedicates about 10% of her practice to non-profit and social justice organizations including 501 Commons, the Underground Railroad, and the Freedom Project. She also delights in being a mother, outdoor adventure, dancing, yoga, “the Mind Illuminated” mindfulness meditation student teacher and intentional community living.

 

Nikum Pon, Ph.D., Co-founder, Racial Equity Adaptive Leadership.

Dr. Nikum Pon has dedicated the last 22 years of his life working with a wide range of students and their families in racially, linguistically, and culturally diverse communities in predominantly low-income settings in the greater Seattle area. He spent nine of those years at SafeFutures Youth Center, a grassroots community/youth development agency that serves predominantly low-income Southeast Asians and East African youth and families. As a staff member, he was directly responsible for four major programs - National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA), After-school Tutorial, Asset Team, and Bilingual Case Management services. As a result, 95% of youth who were gang-involved or at-risk of gang involvement graduated from high school and/or moved on to working full-time to support their families. As a board of directors’ secretary and president, he oversaw SFYC’s development in operations, policies and procedures, long-term strategic planning, annual evaluation of the executive director, board development and financial management. As a result, SFYC’s budget doubled to 2 million dollars. Furthermore, Nikum has taught a number of undergraduate and graduate level courses at the University of Washington and Seattle Pacific University while conducting various mixed-method research on racial equity pertaining specifically to immigrant refugee students and families of color.

 

Currently, Nikum is the Director of Equity in Education for the Puget Sound Educational Service District (PSESD). In this position, he and his team support King and Pierce county school districts toward systems transformation to ensure academic excellence for each and every student, which upholds the PSESD’s mission to ensure success for each child and eliminate the opportunity gap by leading with racial equity. He has developed and implemented research-based gap closing strategies along with providing on-going racial equity training and coaching for a wide-range of educators both locally and regionally to build their capacity to strengthen students’ educational outcomes.  

 

Nikum’s academic preparation includes a Bachelor’s Degree in Cell Molecular Biology and Doctor of Philosophy degree in Educational Psychology and Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington, and Master’s Degree in Education from Seattle Pacific University. In addition, he completed his certification in Adaptive Leadership, a high impact collaborative leadership model, from Leadership Eastside as class of 2017. Nikum is a life-long learner as he continues to find ways to deepen his learning as a systems thinker, leader and critical race theorist. 

Mending the Broken Trust Between Black Women and White Women

Session 3: Tuesday, May 14, 2019

So much “stuff “ exists in the relationship space between Black women and White women. And we don’t talk about it much—at least not in the relationship space. Broken trust, historical roles, impact of privilege and oppression, disparate access to opportunity, perceived competence, status and real power—this is some of the “stuff” in the relationship space. In this session, our goal is to open up dialogue, in alliance with other participants, so that more trusting relationships might emerge, ones in which the parties understand how to demonstrate mutual care and respect.

 

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will:

  • Gain greater awareness of how to mitigate the role sociocultural history plays in relationships between Black and White women

  • Identify their personal role in dismantling the systems that prevent effective dialogue across racial and ethnic identities

  • Know the elements they can draw on to build more positive relationships across difference

  • Craft action steps to better engage with and support women (and men) different than themselves

  • Indicate their commitment to educate themselves further

 

Presenters:

Joy L. Wiggins, PhD. is a speaker, writer, scholar and facilitator who promotes racial and gender justice through compassion and open dialogue to ignite equitable, empowering and transformative practices.

Joy provides extensive on-site and online training for organizations, education (K-12 and Higher Ed) and corporations to better incorporate equitable and inclusive practices with compassion and open dialogue.

 

Joy received her doctorate from The Ohio State University in multicultural education, cultural identity and social justice. She works in the Elementary Education department at Western Washington University teaching multicultural children’s literature, literacy and English language learning courses. She owns an equity and inclusion consulting company that focuses on power, privilege, liberation and racial and gender justice. She has spent the last 20 years working on understanding our cultural identities and perceptions of how we navigate the world through our cultural identities. Her consulting centers around understanding biases, racial and gender justice, and women supporting women in the workplace.

 

She is currently co-writing a book with Kami J. Anderson based on her 2017 TEDxWWU talk, “Women Liberating Women in the Workplace” . Her goal is to facilitate transformative learning opportunities infused with empathy, education and liberation for all. She focuses on the power of storytelling to connect us.

 

Speaking:

Joy’s speaking entails her work around:

 

Implicit bias and Microaggressions

  • Her book, “ From Sabotage to Support: A New Vision for Feminist Solidarity in the Workplace ” co-authored with Kami Anderson and her Ted Talk , how women can better support each other in the workplace

  • Racial and Gender Justice in the workplace

  • Storytelling to better connect and cultivate relationships across difference

  • Developing an empowering and engaging social justice identity 


 

Classes and workshops: Many of the workshops include examining implicit biases, everyday inter and cross cultural communication practices to better enhance the workplace. Our mission is to create socially just, equitable and liberatory practices to foster inclusion and empowering practices for all participants. 
What makes Joy’s workshops different is her willingness to share her own experiences, missteps and learnings. Opening up a space of trust and vulnerability creates an opportunity for transformation and change. She also uses an interactive, discussion-based approach so participants can discuss what they are learning and clarify ideas that they might not otherwise have been willing to share.

 

One on one mentoring: Joy provides mentorship on how to be a better ally in social justice work. She provides a deeper one-on-one structure for individuals wanting to dig deeper into their socialization, allyship and understanding around social justice issues. This includes anyone who wants to understand the social issues of today around race, gender, queer identities in education, corporations and non-profits.

Kami J. Anderson, Ph.D. is an interculturalist, scholar and language advocate. Dr. Anderson has spent the past two decades immersed in languages and cultures.  Dr. Anderson has been teaching in higher education since 2005.  Her primary focus is family empowerment through language with an emphasis on application and confidence. She has published extensively in both English and Spanish, and is the author of Language, Identity and Choice: Raising Bilingual Children in a Global Society. She was awarded the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Grant and is currently on the Fulbright Specialist Roster for intercultural communication.  Dr. Anderson holds a Bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Spelman College, a Master’s degree in International Affairs/Interdisciplinary Studies in International Communication and Anthropology from American University and a PhD in Communication and Culture from Howard University. 

 

In her 20+ years consulting in intercultural training, Dr. Anderson has worked with organizations and companies such as: Youth for Understanding, Gwinnett County Chamber of Commerce, Clark Atlanta University, Sankofa Educational Leadership, The Exchange, and City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs - P.A.Y.S. She also worked for over a decade as an associate professor of communication at  Kennesaw State University.

 

Dr. Anderson is the co-author of, From Sabotage to Support: A New Vision for Feminist Solidarity in the Workplace, with Dr. Joy Wiggins (Berrett Koehler Publishers, available May 2019).

Reconciliation: Building Allyship Between Black Men and White Men

Session 4: Tuesday, June 25, 2019

The relationship space between Black men and White men is charged with fear, racism, and apprehension within the context of a long historical, deep emotional divide in American history. Currently, we can point to examples where black male leaders are maligned and disparaged simply trying to fulfill their roles as advocates in government, business and sports. Conversely, white men are grappling with the fear of being typecast, excluded, or marginalized in a society that embraces its full multi-cultural identity. We believe there is so much opportunity to build allyship between these two groups of men, and others—the future compels it.

Learning Objectives:

Building a foundation for greater empathy and allyship among Black/White men in order to:

  • help men harness the positive aspects of masculinity

  • eliminate harm caused by patriarchy

  • expand male leadership to be responsive, agile, and creative

Presenters:

Joel A. Brown, J.D., Ed.D. is a thought leader specializing in cultural intelligence, leadership, and organizational strategy. As a change agent, Joel works strategically with organizational leaders to cultivate innovative, creative, and adaptive environments where the cultural genius of everyone can be harnessed and leveraged successfully. 

 

Best known for his critical analysis, creativity, humor, and his ability to build consensus, Joel has partnered with Fortune 500 Companies, non-profit organizations, and government agencies to help them achieve sustained growth and organizational breakthroughs. His clients have ranged from LinkedIn to the United Nations, and his “sweet spots” have included men’s leadership, storytelling and personal narratives, workplace dialogue, and cultural intelligence. 

 

Joel is a member of several international think tanks, including D2K, the Diversity Collegium, SIETAR, and the Global Community Dialogue. He is also an Expert Panelist with the Global Diversity & Inclusion Benchmarks and certified in the Cultural Detective suite of intercultural tools.  Joel is also a visiting professor at the IESEG Management School in Paris, France, and Lille France.

 

Joel graduated magna cum laude from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and philosophy, with a minor in Spanish and African-American studies.  Subsequently, Joel earned his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2000, and was also inducted into the University of Virginia Raven’s Society.  In 2018, Joel completed his doctorate in educational leadership from Saint Mary’s College of California.

 

Nick Van Santen, M.Div., Ed.D. is the Assistant Director of Student Formation and Immersions at Saint Mary’s College of California outside Oakland, USA. Nick specializes in creating transformative learning experiences, offering a holistic approach to human development, and relationship building. As an educator, Nick works strategically with community partners to accelerate participants’ learning and development by integrating social justice theory with reflective practices so that leaders can personally grow in ways that promote the common good.

 

Best known for his innovative programs, community engagement, warmth, and his ability to cultivate diverse and authentic teams, Nick has partnered with non-profit organizations to maximize resources and impact through innovative instruction and community engagement opportunities ranging from food justice in Salinas, CA to gentrification in West Oakland to youth and homelessness in Los Angeles to immigration along the US/Mexico Border. Nick’s “sweet spots” include men’s mentorship, leadership development, and social-emotional support. 

 

Nick is a member of the National Steering Committee for Fair Trade Colleges and Universities and participant of the Interfaith Leadership Institute. He is also an Adjunct Faculty member with the Kalmanovitz School of Education at Saint Mary’s College. Nick is a SafeZone facilitator, instructor of a campus-wide introductory leadership course, and Title IX officer. Nick is a graduate of the College of Idaho and Princeton Theological Seminary, and received his doctorate in Educational Leadership from Saint Mary’s College of California in 2018.

Grappling with Cultural Humility for the Intersectional Person with Invisible Disabilities

Session 5: Tuesday, September 24, 2019

“Invisible Disabilities is only one thread in the tapestry of the holistic lived experience of the intersectional person,” says ChrisTiana Obeysumner, presenter of this session. 

 

The “intersectional person” refers to how all of the threads of our tapestry—or the many overlapping identities we each have—come together in the design of our holistic being in the world. However, our society has a tendency to focus on one identity at a time, not how each of our identities are interwoven. 

 

With invisible disabilities, or any identity that is not lived “out loud,” losing sight of this extremely important thread and identity is more common that it should ever be. 

 

In this training, we will lead a conversation on invisible disabilities from the perspective of intersectionality, and with a lens of cultural humility. The workshop will include opportunities to hear from others who share these lived experiences, as well as cultural humility exercises to learn how you can sustain the tapestry of people with invisible and intersectional disabilities, not snare or snag through inequity.

 

Why is Cultural Humility such important learning for all equity and inclusion efforts? 

 

Cultural humility is the lifelong commitment to increasing awareness of self and our impacts on others through a praxis, (or cycle of practice) of four pillars: 

 

  1. Lifelong self evaluation and critique, 

  2. Lifelong learning and growth, 

  3. Evaluation of “power-over” dynamics, and elimination of those that are oppressive or marginalizing, and amplification and allyship to those most affected by inequity or injustice, and 

  4. Continually working to dismantle oppressive and harmful systems and dynamics.

 

“When it comes to intersectional disability justice, especially for folks with invisible disabilities, cultural humility is the foundation to create an equitable and inclusive workplace from the core outward,” says Ms. Obeysumner. Often, this topic focuses on how able-bodied or “neurotypical” (those who have minds and brains that fall within the ‘average) can empower, support, or encourage disabled or neurodivergent people in the workplace. But many people with disabilities feel they can take care of themselves—it’s others’ behavior and attitudes, or the workplace environment or systems, that become a barrier. This dynamic of “the social model of disability” is one of the main foundations for creating an equitable and inclusive workplace for people with invisible and intersectional disabilities. This workshop will provide tools for all employees and managers to move from well-intentioned to well-aware, and set accountability benchmarks and measures through culturally humble practices.

 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:

  • Learn key connections between social equity, justice, invisible and intersectional disabilities

  • Acquire tools to increase awareness and mindfulness of one’s (un)conscious impacts that may create barriers for people with invisible and intersectional disabilities

  • Broaden their perspectives by listening to the relevant histories and narratives of the lived experiences of people with invisible and intersectional disabilities

  • Gain an overview of cultural humility and its importance in equitable inclusion

  • Discover tools and exercises for how to move toward a more inclusive and equitable workplace for people with invisible and intersectional disabilities.  

Presenter:  

ChrisTiana ObeySumner, MNPL is a social equity advocate, educator, and consultant. They are the founders of Epiphanies of Equity: Education and Consulting, and The Eleanor Elizabeth Institute for Black Empowerment. 

 

For almost two decades, they have dedicated their life and career to amplifying the importance of social equity -- particularly narrative identity development and it's role in cultural humility and allyship, intersectional disability justice, bringing awareness to the lived experience of racialized ableism and externalizing antiblackness, and dismantling the psychosocial paradigms that underlie social injustice and inaction. 

 

Their process is based in their lived experience as an Autistic and disabled, Black and Indigenous, Femme-presenting yet fluid person, as well as over a decade of formal study in social and existential psychology and counseling methods, nonprofit leadership, public policy and administration. They also hold several positions of community organizing leadership, including co-chairing the Seattle Renters and Seattle Disabilities Commissions, V.P. of Education for Seattle University's Black Alumni Association, and serving on the King County Metro Transit Advisory Council. 

Communicating in Polarizing Times: Words Matter!

Session 6: Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Communication matters! The words you choose matter if you truly want to create an inclusive environment.  At the heart of this choice is emotional intelligence: “Emotional intelligence skills are leadership skills are equity skills,” says Fleur Larsen, presenter of this session.  

 

This experiential session emphasizes communication in the form of Equity Leadership Skills, necessary skills for building equity, which is the context for how power and privilege play out. The spoken and unspoken cultural norms of communication are key pieces to advancing racial equity in yourself, and in your workplace. Here in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) we have a unique flavor of communication norms referred to as passive aggressive and conflict aversion. Based on WASP (white, anglo, saxon Protestant and middle class), the PNW regionally values indirect and 'watered down' sharing of information. This is significant because it is hard to manage for something if you cannot name it clearly for everyone to understand. Tone policing, vagueness, deflecting, blaming the messenger for bringing up things rather than engaging in the content of the message, civility politics, conflict aversion, etc., are a few forms this takes.

 

Words may convey respect and dignity, or shame and distrust. Words set the tone in the culture of an organization. Participants at this session will come away with greater knowledge and skills for communicating in ways that foster inclusion and equity. 

Learning Objectives:

As a result of attending this session, participants will:

  • Increase their awareness of personal, professional, cultural and regional communication norms

  • Learn how conflict and communication styles affect creating inclusive cultures

  • Recognize and name power dynamics that inhibit inclusive communication

  • Identify how bias is being transmitted in company communication and causing harm

 

Presenters:

Fleur Larsen, Fleur Larsen Facilitation, started facilitating 20 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Her style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, joy, and purposeful results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach goals.

Currently, she works with several corporate and nonprofit groups facilitating retreats, training's and workshops in addition to one on one coaching. Fleur’s work as a Seattle-based facilitator is focused on equity, social justice, diversity and inclusion, team building, emotional intelligence, experiential education and community development.

Fleur Larsen started facilitating 20 years ago on challenge course programs with youth and adults. Her style is based on sharp analysis, flexible thinking, joy, and purposeful results. Her work is relationship-based with connection, collaboration, and community as integral elements to reach goals. Currently, she works with several corporate and nonprofit groups facilitating retreats, training's and workshops in addition to one on one coaching.

Her work as a Seattle-based facilitator is focused on equity, social justice, diversity and inclusion, team building, emotional intelligence, experiential education and community development.

Andrea Paull, M.Ed., has been facilitating workshops centered on racial equity, building cultural capacity and transformation for the past 12 years, and has dedicated her life to supporting leaders who are committed to creating extraordinary results towards an equitable world. She currently works at a local school district after serving 10 years in higher education, and previously worked in the banking and real estate industries.

Andrea earned her Bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Washington, Seattle, and her Master’s in Education from Western Governors University.

Andrea is a Filipina immigrant currently residing in Bothell with her husband, Terry, and two children, Elena and Christian.

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