Statement of Solidarity With Black Lives Matter

The REALITIES: Systemic Racism. Institutional Racism. Structural Racism. White Supremacy. Anti-Black Racism. Police Brutality. Police Violence, Social & Economic Inequity. Inequality.  

 

We have reached a tipping point in the United States—the moment when the unbridled killing of black people and other people of color by the police and white vigilantes, and the dehumanization of black and brown people by white people, has reached “critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point.”*

 

Finally, the REALITIES are being voiced in public by mayors, police chiefs, police officers, governors, members of Congress, Senators, attorneys general and corporate and organizational leaders.  Admitting in public that brutality, violence and bias are baked into the system may begin to create a new reality. But the words are not enough. They have to translate into actions—actions to dismantle and remake the system. “…our actions create our reality and … we can change it,” wrote Peter Senge.  

 

We need to spark a “social epidemic” as Gladwell calls it, to be as prolific as the Coronavirus pandemic disease. "Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread like viruses do,” says Gladwell. Indeed, we can learn from the COVID-19 virus! We have to spread the actions and behaviors of systemic change like a virus.

The Institute for Sustainable Diversity and Inclusion stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter Movement and all the protestors calling for systemic change in police organizations. But that’s not enough. We believe all organizations, including the police, must examine their systems for institutionalized racism and white supremacy.

 

To that end, ISDI is re-dedicating its unique community forum in the Puget Sound Region, the NW Diversity Learning Series, for 2020 and into 2021 to:

 

  • Build greater capacity of individuals to change their organizational systems—both public and private organizations.  

 

  • Foster learning that helps to shape a more inclusive and just society.

 

  • Be a venue for courageous conversations about anti-Black racism, the history of racism in our country and our region, and why the quest for social justice has not been realized.

 

  • Spark innovation—we have to radically re-imagine a different way to bring about inclusive and equitable organizations and society. People should thrive in relation to organizations—not die!

 

EACH OF US IS RESPONSIBLE:  Each of us must take TIME to EXAMINE OURSELVES DEEPLY, to REFLECT on the kind of society we want to foster, and our moral values, to ACTIVELY LISTEN to our black brothers and sisters who experience racial oppressions on a daily basis, to LEARN and finally to ACT with moral courage and certitude.

 

We must act—WE HAVE NO CHOICE. 

Click here for RESOURCES to build greater understanding

 

*The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make A Big Difference, by Malcom Gladwell. Little, Brown & Co., 2000.

The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of The Learning Organization, by Peter M. Senge. Doubleday Currency, 1990.